Let's write us a book!


 

Hi there!

Thanks for expressing interesting in being part of “The Pony Book”. I like that I am already seeing it mentioned in the community with the appropriate scare quotes around it like “The Book”. This pleases me greatly.

I’ve been delaying writing this first email until the State of the Stable survey was done running and I had written up the results. I strongly suggest that you go check them out, they are the best means we currently have for getting insight into the people who are checking out/using Pony. You can find my writeup at https://groups.io/g/pony/wiki/State-of-the-Stable-2016 and from there, you can get the raw data if you are interested. There’s some interesting stuff in the Wufoo report that didn’t make the write up.

I have two tasks for anyone who wants to participate in the book. They are detailed below:

Item 1

Write up a description of who is the target reader. This should be at least a couple paragraphs and no more than 1 page. This is one of the most important things we are going to do. We need, as a group, to come to an agreement on who the reader will be. The final document we come up with after getting everyone’s input will define what the basic knowledge a read is expected to have. Let me give you an example:

Debugging Pony is done using GDB or LLDB, is that something we expect every reader to know? If not, we need to teach the reader how to use GDB or LLDB before we teach them how to debug Do they have to have experience with concurrent code via threading? It’s certainly a large part of the story for how Pony is “marketed” but, is there really anything where that should be required? Can we write a book that can teach both the threaded Java/C programmer as well as the Python on Ruby programmer? Do we want to try?

The point of this exercise is to establish a baseline. Any knowledge that isn’t in the baseline that is required to understand something in the book has to be included in the book.

Item 2

Start the “Pony for X” series. What is the “Pony for X” series? Its an intro to Pony written for people with experience in different languages. We’ll figure out together how we can divide up as many languages as possible and we’ll each write something like “Pony for C programmers”, “Pony for Rubyists” etc. The goal of each is to explain to someone who is moderately competent in the language why they should care about Pony. What does Pony provide, what does it look like, what are its important features.

Note, that I said “moderately competent”, that’s a really handwavey term. I could have said “someone with a year or two experience with the language” but that is also a handwave. You’ll need to come up a target audience and what they know for the “Pony for X” that you write as well. And it should look different than what you came up with for Item 1 because, its a much more constrained audience pool.

I expect that a rough draft of one of these would be 8 to 12 pages but that too is also a hand wave. Write what you can and we can work on editing them together as a group.

So, let everyone know what language you would like to step up and handle.

Best, Sean


Ivo Balbaert
 

Hi all,

Thank you Sean for all the fundamental work.

For Item 2 of the tasks I would like to write a "Pony for C# and .NET Developers".

VB.NET and C# are the languages I developed the most in (15 years), also for web applications.

I can also make a comparison between Pony and F#.

This probably should be a different item in the series, because they have a lot more in common;

 

Regards,

Ivo

 

From: Sean T. Allen [mailto:sean@...]
Sent: zaterdag 12 maart 2016 19:04
To: pony+book@groups.io
Subject: [pony+book] Let's write us a book!

 

Hi there!

Thanks for expressing interesting in being part of “The Pony Book”. I like that I am already seeing it mentioned in the community with the appropriate scare quotes around it like “The Book”. This pleases me greatly.

I’ve been delaying writing this first email until the State of the Stable survey was done running and I had written up the results. I strongly suggest that you go check them out, they are the best means we currently have for getting insight into the people who are checking out/using Pony. You can find my writeup at https://groups.io/g/pony/wiki/State-of-the-Stable-2016 and from there, you can get the raw data if you are interested. There’s some interesting stuff in the Wufoo report that didn’t make the write up.

I have two tasks for anyone who wants to participate in the book. They are detailed below:

Item 1

Write up a description of who is the target reader. This should be at least a couple paragraphs and no more than 1 page. This is one of the most important things we are going to do. We need, as a group, to come to an agreement on who the reader will be. The final document we come up with after getting everyone’s input will define what the basic knowledge a read is expected to have. Let me give you an example:

Debugging Pony is done using GDB or LLDB, is that something we expect every reader to know? If not, we need to teach the reader how to use GDB or LLDB before we teach them how to debug Do they have to have experience with concurrent code via threading? It’s certainly a large part of the story for how Pony is “marketed” but, is there really anything where that should be required? Can we write a book that can teach both the threaded Java/C programmer as well as the Python on Ruby programmer? Do we want to try?

The point of this exercise is to establish a baseline. Any knowledge that isn’t in the baseline that is required to understand something in the book has to be included in the book.

Item 2

Start the “Pony for X” series. What is the “Pony for X” series? Its an intro to Pony written for people with experience in different languages. We’ll figure out together how we can divide up as many languages as possible and we’ll each write something like “Pony for C programmers”, “Pony for Rubyists” etc. The goal of each is to explain to someone who is moderately competent in the language why they should care about Pony. What does Pony provide, what does it look like, what are its important features.

Note, that I said “moderately competent”, that’s a really handwavey term. I could have said “someone with a year or two experience with the language” but that is also a handwave. You’ll need to come up a target audience and what they know for the “Pony for X” that you write as well. And it should look different than what you came up with for Item 1 because, its a much more constrained audience pool.

I expect that a rough draft of one of these would be 8 to 12 pages but that too is also a hand wave. Write what you can and we can work on editing them together as a group.

So, let everyone know what language you would like to step up and handle.

Best, Sean


Dit e-mailbericht is verzonden vanaf een virusvrije computer die wordt beschermd door Avast.
www.avast.com


 

Thanks Ivo,

I agree that C# and F# writeups should be different. 

Thanks!

I look forward to this as we'll have something concrete to start driving forward our process.
Having something smaller and real should really suss out quickly if the tooling et al that
we pick works and makes sense. Plus, get us all on the same page in terms of content etc.

-Sean-


On Sun, Mar 13, 2016 at 6:23 AM, Ivo Balbaert <ivo.balbaert@...> wrote:

Hi all,

Thank you Sean for all the fundamental work.

For Item 2 of the tasks I would like to write a "Pony for C# and .NET Developers".

VB.NET and C# are the languages I developed the most in (15 years), also for web applications.

I can also make a comparison between Pony and F#.

This probably should be a different item in the series, because they have a lot more in common;

 

Regards,

Ivo

 

From: Sean T. Allen [mailto:sean@...]
Sent: zaterdag 12 maart 2016 19:04
To: pony+book@groups.io
Subject: [pony+book] Let's write us a book!

 

Hi there!

Thanks for expressing interesting in being part of “The Pony Book”. I like that I am already seeing it mentioned in the community with the appropriate scare quotes around it like “The Book”. This pleases me greatly.

I’ve been delaying writing this first email until the State of the Stable survey was done running and I had written up the results. I strongly suggest that you go check them out, they are the best means we currently have for getting insight into the people who are checking out/using Pony. You can find my writeup at https://groups.io/g/pony/wiki/State-of-the-Stable-2016 and from there, you can get the raw data if you are interested. There’s some interesting stuff in the Wufoo report that didn’t make the write up.

I have two tasks for anyone who wants to participate in the book. They are detailed below:

Item 1

Write up a description of who is the target reader. This should be at least a couple paragraphs and no more than 1 page. This is one of the most important things we are going to do. We need, as a group, to come to an agreement on who the reader will be. The final document we come up with after getting everyone’s input will define what the basic knowledge a read is expected to have. Let me give you an example:

Debugging Pony is done using GDB or LLDB, is that something we expect every reader to know? If not, we need to teach the reader how to use GDB or LLDB before we teach them how to debug Do they have to have experience with concurrent code via threading? It’s certainly a large part of the story for how Pony is “marketed” but, is there really anything where that should be required? Can we write a book that can teach both the threaded Java/C programmer as well as the Python on Ruby programmer? Do we want to try?

The point of this exercise is to establish a baseline. Any knowledge that isn’t in the baseline that is required to understand something in the book has to be included in the book.

Item 2

Start the “Pony for X” series. What is the “Pony for X” series? Its an intro to Pony written for people with experience in different languages. We’ll figure out together how we can divide up as many languages as possible and we’ll each write something like “Pony for C programmers”, “Pony for Rubyists” etc. The goal of each is to explain to someone who is moderately competent in the language why they should care about Pony. What does Pony provide, what does it look like, what are its important features.

Note, that I said “moderately competent”, that’s a really handwavey term. I could have said “someone with a year or two experience with the language” but that is also a handwave. You’ll need to come up a target audience and what they know for the “Pony for X” that you write as well. And it should look different than what you came up with for Item 1 because, its a much more constrained audience pool.

I expect that a rough draft of one of these would be 8 to 12 pages but that too is also a hand wave. Write what you can and we can work on editing them together as a group.

So, let everyone know what language you would like to step up and handle.

Best, Sean


Dit e-mailbericht is verzonden vanaf een virusvrije computer die wordt beschermd door Avast.
www.avast.com



 

My main programming experience is in Java since '97, and most recently in Go for the last couple of years.

I could tackle one or both of those for Item 2. Are you thinking that the "Pony for X" books would be short introductions that prepare people for the main Pony Book which would go into more detail? And what languages do you think we should cover?



 

Hi Carl, 

I see from the wiki that you already grabbed Java for yourself. Excellent.
I see the "Pony for X" as intro's. In a print book they might not work, but 
online we can have 10-20 pages targeted at people from specific languages
and I think, be much more effective in communicating the basics of
"what Pony is".

Its also an excellent exercise to get us all talking about "how do we explain Pony?"

-S-


On Mon, Mar 14, 2016 at 1:30 PM, Carl Quinn <carl.quinn@...> wrote:

My main programming experience is in Java since '97, and most recently in Go for the last couple of years.

I could tackle one or both of those for Item 2. Are you thinking that the "Pony for X" books would be short introductions that prepare people for the main Pony Book which would go into more detail? And what languages do you think we should cover?